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Winners Target 2: Titan, Tethys and Enceladus -- 2010 U.S. Edition

Winners Target 2: Titan, Tethys and Enceladus -- 2010 U.S. Edition


Alden Hogdon


Grade 5 and 6

Alden William Hodgdon

Saint Jeanne De Lestonnac
Tustin, Calif.


" I feel that Target 2, Tethys and Saturn’s Rings are the most important of the three targets that the scientists should be studying. This target shows Tethys Moon and some parts of Saturn’s Rings. According to some information that I read, Cassini has had only a couple of sightings that the moon could be contributing to a ring. Tethys might be made up of other icy moons and this could be very interesting to the scientist."

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Sarah Donofrio

Grade 7 and 8

Sarah Donofrio

Linwood Middle School
North Brunswick, N.J.


"Saturn’s glorious rings will also be visible in the video. They are of particular interest to many scientists. The biggest question of all is their age. Some claim that the rings came into being at the same time as the planets in the solar system. But others argue that if they were that old, there would be dirty ice from comets mixed with the pristine, sparkling crystals that make up the rings. Another mystery is their origin. Are the rings made up of debris from moons that were smashed by asteroids? Are they remnants of Saturn from when it was formed? These answers will help scientists understand how solar systems are created."

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Grade 9 to 12

Cody Minor

Beatrice High School
Beatrice, Neb.


"The frozen, early-Earth conditions found on Titan present an appealing opportunity to investigate the possible origins of life on Earth. Tethys, Enceladus, and the E-ring of Saturn already have known interactions, this target allows for more observations about them and their interactions."

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Cody Minor