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Cassini Scientist for a Day -- Fall 2009 Winners
Target 1: Saturn & Rings, Grade 5 & 6

Cassini Scientist for a Day -- Fall 2009 Winners
Target 1: Saturn & Rings, Grade 5 & 6


Emily Relic
Saturn and its rings
Saturn and its Rings
Emily Relic

5th Grade
Valley View Elementary School
Teacher: Robert Palassou
Pleasanton, Calif.


"Every day, the stars twinkle in the night sky, and I never knew that some "stars" could be planets. "I think that Target #1 Saturn and Rings is the best choice. In my next paragraph, I will explain why I picked the beautiful Saturn and Rings.

Saturn has been a mysterious planet for many years, and that's why I think it is best if Cassini takes a photo of Saturn. Its rings have also made scientists curious and confused. Many questions explode in my brain and in the scientists brains. Scientists want the same answers. For example, are the rings part of a moon that was ripped apart by tidal forces between Saturn and other moons? Are the rings scraps of when Saturn was forming? How long will these rings last? A lot of these questions are asked everyday all around the world. Having pictures of the rings would be really helpful in answering these questions.

Since we can't send astronauts to Saturn, we must send a spacecraft to see if the ground is solid, and the gas isn't dangerous. Saturn has many rigs like the E ring, G ring, and the F ring. Some of the E ring is made out of water, and some is made out of meteorite. Really though, what other materials is it made of? On Saturn, the density is low. If you put Saturn in a bathtub, it would float.

Also, Saturn stirs terrific typoons or hurricanes. The rings are mostly made of rock and ice. Even Prometheus own gravitational pull would pull Saturn's rings. We know all of this because of Cassini, but we still need more answers. More pictures means more studying Saturn and its rings.

The scientists today are wondering a lot about Saturn and rings, but nobody can answer them. Questions like the ones everybody asks can only be answered by having detailed and descriptive pictures, like the ones Cassini takes. Why don't we take these beautiful pictures of Saturn and its rings?"