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Scientist for a Day 8th Edition

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Main: Contest Overview

Robert Mitchell with students from Shirley Avenue Elementary School in Reseda, Calif.
Robert T. Mitchell, Cassini program manager, with students from Shirley Avenue Elementary School in Reseda, Calif. The students participated in the pilot edition of Cassini Scientist for a Day in the Fall of 2005.
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International Cassini Scientist for a Day is a IYA2009 Special Project.

Cassini Scientist for a Day is an essay contest designed to give students a taste of life as a scientist. Students compare and research three possible targets that the Cassini spacecraft can image during a given time set aside for education. They are to choose the one observation they think will yield the best science results and explain their reasons in an essay.

In the United States, 372 students from 20 states participated. Meet the authors whose essays were judged best in the country as reviewed by Cassini team members. Then look behind the scenes at their entries, and see what it took to come out on top.

To celebrate the 2009 International Year of Astronomy, the contest was also open to all nations and educational organizations. Each country and/or educational organization was encouraged to run the contest either following our guidelines or customizing them to fit their needs. These organizations were tasked to collect and judge the essays, and to send the winning entries to the Cassini Outreach Team. Students from 27 countries sent their entries, some in English and some in their native languages.

Meet these future scientists inside these pages..



Students who participated in Cassini Scientist for a Day contest asked scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., questions about Saturn, its magnificent rings and the mysterious moons in its orbit, including Titan and Tethys -- targets for the latest Fall 2009 edition of the essay contest.
Follow these links to review those targets:
Target 1: Saturn & Rings; Target 2: Tethys & Rings and Target 3: Titan .

The event has been recorded, and is available on Ustream.

+ Watch the Webcast (63 minutes)





To be notified of all contest updates, send an e-mail to:
scientistforaday@jpl.nasa.gov
(Please write "Add me to the mailing list" in the subject field.)