Follow this link to skip to the main content

International Edition Winners 2011: Australia, Target 3

International Edition Winners 2011: Australia, Target 3


Annalise Donohue
Saturn
Saturn
Annalise Donohue

Year 5
Genazzano FCJ College
Kew, Victoria





"I believe that Saturn should be photographed because many people only know about its rings and nothing else. Saturn is the second of the 4 gas giants. Like Jupiter it gives off more heat than it gets from the sun. But unlike Jupiter, it has a magnificent set of rings, and it's so light that it would float in water - if you could find a bath big enough! Saturn is about 120,000 km across. It takes 29.46 years to go around the Sun. Like Jupiter, it spins very rapidly - the day lasts for 10 hours and 39 minutes. It has a similar structure to Jupiter. It has a solid core, which is surrounded by a shell of solid hydrogen, which is in turn surrounded by a shell of liquid hydrogen, and then the giant shell of atmosphere.

Saturn's rings probably formed when things like comets, asteroids or even moons that broke up in orbit around Saturn due to Saturn's very strong gravity. The pieces of these objects kept colliding with each other and broke into even smaller pieces. These pieces gradually spread around Saturn to form its rings.

I know there are many storms on Saturn and if we decide to photograph Saturn we could find out how the storms are formed, how they started & what damage is caused by the storms. This knowledge could be improved if we took more photographs of Saturn. E.g. it’s five hundred times bigger than any anything like it observed by the Cassini Mission in the last two years. It’s encompassing approximately 2 billion square miles (4 billion square kilometers) of Saturn’s surface. Its releasing lightning bolts at a rate of ten per second and it’s happening ten times more frequently than other storms monitored since 2004. It’s so intense that’s its even visible in larger amateur telescopes. Just what is it? A Saturn Super Storm… Why, why did this happen? How did it happen? What did it do? These are all the big questions & we need to answer these. We can by taking more photographs of Saturn.

I hope you take this and consider taking more photos of Saturn."